Sessions

Sessions

Sessions
No. Session title Organizer Session abstract
1 GENOMICS FOR IMPROVED FISHERIES MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION: HAVE THE PROMISES BEEN FULFILLED?
  1. LouisBernatchez, Université Laval, Canada, Louis.Bernatchez@bio.ulaval.ca
  2. MarenWellenreuther, University of Lund, Sweden and Plant & Food Research, New Zealand, Maren.wellenreuther@biol.lu.se
New sequencing technologies have led to the recent development of potentially powerful genomic tools for fisheries management, biosecurity, conservation and aquaculture applications. These tools have enabled researchers to assemble full genome sequences, scan for marker variation frequencies across the entire genome, and to test for genome-wide differences in gene expression patterns both at an ever diminishing cost and in any species desired. These genomic tools hold the promise to potentially revolutionize the management and conservation of aquatic resources by: (i) Scaling-up genome coverage for non-model species, leading to improved estimates of population genetic parameters, especially in the many weakly structured marine species; (ii) Identifying markers under natural selection to define management units based on adaptive criteria as well as markers for pathogens to manage their spread; (iii) Finding causal relationships between genetic variation, gene expression, phenotypes and the environment to predict future dynamics of selectively important variation and to forecast the potential for adaptation to changing environments (e.g. global warming, ocean acidification, coastal pollution, selective harvesting, etc.). These methods may also allow improved genetic tagging to identify fish of unknown origins and their associated pathogens, estimation of “real time” migration rates and dispersal, as well as informing reseeding strategies for sustainable exploitation and the restocking of natural populations. These tools further offer to advance aquaculture production by means of genomic selection, and identifying wild populations with the most potential for domestication. The number of studies that have applied genomic tools has been steadily increasing, but have rarely been integrated into policy decisions, both from a fisheries, biosecurity and an aquaculture viewpoint. The lack of integration makes it timely to hold a meeting that will focus explicitly on whether the promises offered by these new methods have been fulfilled and how we can bridge the gap between the demonstrated power of these tools and their policy and management application in real life situations. This session will aim at evaluating these very questions by bringing together some of most important international contributors in the field of fisheries genomics working on either fish or shellfish in marine or freshwater systems.
2 MONITORING, ASSESSING AND MITIGATING BYCATCH OF SPECIES OF CONSERVATION CONCERN IN TUNA FISHERIES
  1. Dr. Eric Gilman, Hawaii Pacific University and The Nature Conservancy, USA, FisheriesResearchGroup@gmail.com
  2. Dr. Martin Hall, Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission, MHall@iattc.org
  3. Dr. Petri Suuronen, FAO Fishing Operations and Technology Branch, Petri.Suuronen@fao.org
Mortality in marine capture fisheries directly impacts both market and non-market species, and can have broad, indirect effects on community structure, processes and stability. Fisheries that target relatively fecund species with r-selected life history characteristics, such as tunas and tuna-like species, can have large impacts on incidentally caught species with K-selected life-history strategies, including seabirds, sea turtles, marine mammals, elasmobranchs and some bony fishes. As a result of their life history characteristics, and in some cases due to behaviors such as forming aggregations, these K-selected associated and dependent species have low resistance and resilience to even low levels of anthropogenic sources of mortality. Mitigating fishing mortality of species that are relatively vulnerable due to their life history characteristics and susceptibility to capture and mortality in fisheries, one component of an ecosystem approach to fisheries management, has received increasing international attention in recent decades. More recently, the drive for fisheries management systems to gradually adopt elements of ecosystem-based management has increased interest to understand the broad community- and ecosystem-level effects of fisheries bycatch, including those caused by indirect functional and structural links. This session will provide opportunities for participants to learn and share knowledge of considerations and best practices to monitor, assess, avoid and reduce bycatch rates and mortality in tuna fisheries.
3 POST HARVEST SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (FOOD SCIENCES)
  1. Dr. Jae Park , Oregon State University, USA, jae.park@oregonstate.edu
  2. Dr. Young-Mog Kim, Pukyong National University, Korea, ymkim@pknu.ac.kr
Seafood is generally defined as food from the sea. Seafood including fish, shellfish (crustaceans, mollusks, and echinoderms) and seaweeds is a rich source of nutrients and has been consumed over worldwide. Actually, it is an important source of protein and nutrients for human health. Furthermore, many of recent studies have been revealed the healthy functional properties of seafood on human health. In fact, seafood contains high-quality protein and other essential nutrients such as omega-3 fatty acids. However, seafood is to be easily spoilage after catching or harvesting resulting in post-harvest losses. In addition, health risks of seafood associated with contamination of heavy metals, toxins and pathogenic microbes have been extensively addressed. Post-harvest losses of seafood are caused by poor handling and preservation or the discarding of by-catch. Processing of seafood mainly inhibits and/or inactivates bacteria and enzymes which results in shelf-life extension and also assures food safety. This theme on Post Harvest Science and Technology will be included three sessions described below. The theme will provide opportunities for participants to learn and share knowledge of considerations and best practices for Utilization, preservation and processing of seafood; Human health and seafood; and Food safety, standards and traceability of seafood.
4 ADVANCES IN FISHING TECHNOLOGY IN SUPPORT OF SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES
  1. Dr. PingguoHe, School for Marine Science and Technology, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, New Bedford MA, USA. , phe@umassd.edu
  2. Dr. Heui-Chun An, East Sea Fisheries Research Institute, National Fisheries Research & Development Institute, Gangneung, Gangwon-Do, Korea., anhc1@korea.kr
  3. Prof. TakafumiArimoto, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Japan., tarimoto@kaiyodai.ac.jp
Sustainable fisheries is an important component of global food security strategy, and fishing technology plays a key role in protection and sustainable utilization of marine resources, as well as protection of sensitive species and ecosystems. This session will provide a forum for presenting and discussing advances in fishing gear and operations that contributes to sustainable fisheries in global, regional and local scales. The session will include new and novel use of technologies for observing and understanding fish behavior and fishing gear, research on fish physiology and behavior and its application in capture fisheries, development of environmentally friendly fishing technologies and practices, measurement of fuel consumption and means to reduce fuel consumption in capture fisheries, how fishing technology can contributes to fisheries management to reduce bycatch and discards, and the new concept of balanced fishing.
5 GENERAL SESSION
  1. Paul Simonin, pws44@cornell.edu
 
6 MOVING TOWARD A GLOBAL STATUS OF INLAND FISHERIES FIRST STEPS
  1. DougBeard, U.S. Geological Survey, dbeard@usgs.gov
  2. SteveCooke, Carleton University, Steven.Cooke@carleton.ca
  3. BillTaylor, Michigan State University, taylorw@anr.msu.edu
The global status of many of the world’s marine fisheries is relatively well known, allowing for management toward sustainability goals. In contrast, outside of a few high profile inland fisheries (the Laurentian Great Lakes, Lake Victoria, Mekong River), the current status is unknown, making management of these fisheries toward sustainable targets very difficult. The goal of this symposium is to pull together various national and regional efforts to work toward the first steps in a global status of inland fisheries. Emphasis will be on including current ongoing status efforts in data rich areas such as the Laurentian Great Lakes, the ongoing assessment of climate impacts to North American Fisheries, the Environmental Impact Assessment ongoing in the Mekong River, the annual report from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and the work of the Lake Victoria Fisheries Commission with ongoing efforts in relatively data poor regions such as the Amazon Basin, the rivers of Africa and the rest of South East Asia. We will further discuss the tools necessary to develop ongoing assessments of inland fisheries, ideas from species specific approaches (such as IUCN Red Lists) and discuss alternatives that could be used to integrate existing information into a first global assessment of inland fisheries. The primary outcome would be the blueprint for a first step in providing a global assessment of the status of inland fisheries stocks.
7 BIO-ECONOMICS, SOCIO-BIOLOGY AND OTHER MIXES. THE ADVANTAGE OF LINKING DISPARATE DATA TO GAIN NEW INSIGHTS INTO THE EXPLOITATION OF MARINE FISH RESOURCES
  1. ErnestoJardim, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, ernesto.jardim@jrc.ec.europa.eu
  2. GaryCarvalho, University of Bangor, UK, g.r.carvalho@bangor.ac.uk
  3. ArneEide, University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway, arne.eide@uit.no
Recent and earlier changes in the fisheries management paradigm, forced fisheries scientists to look around for alternative ways of gaining insight into a very complex system, like the exploitation of marine resources by fishing. When leaving the comfort of single species management into ecosystem based management, coupled with mixed fisheries and mingled with stronger public and policy involvement, fisheries scientists realized that the world in not round after all, but multi-shape, depending on who's looking and from which angle. A change in mindset requires new approaches and their integration to be developed or reconsideration of traditional approaches, or a mix of everything. For example, the introduction of harvest control rules (HCR) allowed the operationalization of complex indicators and opened the way for a creative and extensive research path. A quick search for "harvest control rules" in google scholar gives more than 800 references between 2010 and 2014. Nevertheless, HCRs deal with one side of the management conundrum, the decision making process, though interesting perspectives remain to be found. Can common sense type of wisdom, limited understanding of complex system behavior or vagueness in objectives and system characterization be used to improve management decisions and possibly gain knowledge about the system? Can the distinct spatial domains be reconciled and is it needed? How can societal information be incorporated? Should fisheries advice be provided without considering economics? The session aims at providing a playground for those interested in having an alternative angle into the wide subject of exploitation of marine fish resources, making use of disparate datasets to build new insights into the fisheries system. Climate, genetics, fleet diversity and multi-objectives are all issues for potential inclusion, with an emphasis on novel insights and integration of ideas and approaches. Fisheries science has the advantage of being intrinsically multi-disciplinary, involving, biologists, engineers, sociologists, ecologists, geneticists, economists, policy, etc. Merging, linking, embedding and visualizing data; are ways of gaining knowledge by efficient utilization of available information. The challenge is to formulate ways to improve the usage of our marine food resources.
8 MAKING SENSE OF INDICATORS FOR EBFM: INTERPRETATION, REFERENCE POINTS AND BUILDING DECISION RULES
  1. AlidaBundy, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, alida.bundy@dfo-mpo.gc.ca
  2. Yunne-jaeShin, Institute of Research for Development, France, yunne-jai.shin@ird.fr
Marine biodiversity is threatened by an array of anthropogenic drivers and stressors. In many marine ecosystems, fisheries exploitation is the main cause of reductions in genetic, species, functional and ecosystem biodiversity. Protection of marine biodiversity is key to support productive and healthy oceans and the provision of many ecosystems services. To this end, regulatory bodies and policy drivers such as the European Commission Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) Aichi Targets call for effective Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management (EBFM) to be in place by 2020, which requires the integration of information on the broader ecosystem and human dimensions. To progress towards effective EBFM, the scientific community has emphasized the development of indicator-based approaches, eg., Integrated ecosystem assessments, to track and evaluate the ecosystem effects of fishing and the effectiveness of management measures to maintain resources in a sustainable form. There is now a wealth of ecosystem and biodiversity indicators proposed by the scientific community and frameworks have been developed for the selection of indicators, mostly based on ecological theory and data availability. However, this is only a part of what is required to meeting the objectives of EBFM, the MSFD and other sustainability targets. This session therefore aims at evaluating the usefulness of indicators and developing the next challenges for EBFM. We invite papers that explore: indicator performance, the likely impacts of climate change on indicator behaviour, the development of indicator reference points, tipping points and thresholds beyond which ecosystems are altered decisions rules for ecosystem indicators integrative, interdisciplinary frameworks to assess the state of marine ecosystems and trigger management actions effective communication of results to management bodies
9 FUTURE OF MARINE FISHERIES UNDER CLIMATE CHANGE: EXPLORING UNCERTAINTIES, FUTURE SCENARIOS AND MULTI-SCALE TRANSFORMATIVE PATHWAYS
  1. William Cheung, Nereus Program, The University of British Columbia, w.cheung@fisheries.ubc.ca
  2. WilfSwartz, Nereus Program, The University of British Columbia, y.ota@fisheries.ubc.ca
  3. RyanRykaczewski, The University of South Carolina, ryk@sc.edu
  4. RebeccaAsch, Princeton University, rasch@princeton.edu
Climate change and acidification impact ocean systems and fisheries in multifaceted ways, through changes in ocean productivity, redistribution of species and fisheries resources and increased variability of some fish stocks. These impacts have large implications for fishing sectors, coastal communities and society, particularly for those that are already vulnerable due to, for instance, resource depletion, existence of perverse subsidies and institutional barriers that inhibit consideration of transboundary issues. To help build climate-resilience for marine fisheries, we need to understand adaptive capacity of both biophysical and human systems, and explore the need and potential for transformations at multiple levels to ensure sustainable oceans and fisheries. Because of the complexity of the marine social-ecological system and the interdisciplinary nature of the issues involved, we need to assess these measures at multiple scales (local, regional and global) and domains (biophysical, economic, social and legal) to avoid mal-adaptation and incompatibility in achieving sustainable fisheries goals. Firstly, we need to better understand the future of the oceans and fisheries and the associated risks and uncertainties. Secondly, we need to evaluate the adaptive capacity of both the natural and human systems to these expected future changes. Thirdly, we need to identify and evaluate options for transformative measures that mitigate or reduce impacts from climate change and ocean acidification. In this 2-day session, we will bring together researchers and practitioners in the fields of oceanography, fisheries science, management, economics, governance and legal studies to discuss their latest findings on: - assessing the vulnerability, risks and uncertainties of future fisheries under climate change and ocean acidification - scenario development for fisheries - exploration of possible adaptation and/or transformative pathways that can lead to sustainable development in the ocean under climate change.
10 TECHNOLOGY AND INLAND FISHERIES: FINDING THE BALANCE OF HYDROPOWER AND RESOURCE SUSTAINABILITY
  1. DougDemko, FISHBIO, dougdemko@fishbio.com
  2. GabeKopp, FISHBIO, gabekopp@fishbio.com
The construction of hydropower dams, particularly on river mainstems, arguably poses one of the greatest challenges to the sustainable management of inland fisheries, particularly in the developing world. Although hydroelectric power provides many benefits, dams pose physical barriers to migrating fish and can alter a river’s hydrology and closely linked ecological processes. Reservoirs may show initial surges in productivity, but sustaining reservoir fisheries can prove challenging. Many tools, in the form of new technologies and traditional approaches, can be used to assess these challenges by investigating fishery responses to hydropower and other development. The results of these technologies and approaches can inform management plans to improve the sustainability of hydropower operations. This session will explore how fisheries research, monitoring, and conservation can be incorporated into hydropower design and management, provide lessons learned from the long history of hydropower in developed countries, and discuss opportunities in the developing world, where hydropower is expanding
11 SALTY STORIES, FRESH SPACES: CROSSOVER LESSONS FOR CONSERVING BIODIVERSITY AND SUSTAINING FISHERIES WITH MARINE AND FRESHWATER PROTECTED AREAS
  1. ErinLoury, FISHBIO, erinloury@fishbio.com
  2. Shaara Ainsley, FISHBIO, shaaraainsley@fishbio.com
  3. DougDemko, FISHBIO, dougdemko@fishbio.com
  4. GabeKopp, FISHBIO, gabekopp@fishbio.com
Place-based approaches to fisheries management and conservation have gained widespread support in recent years through the proliferation of marine protected areas (MPAs). MPAs have been shown to provide many beneficial effects, such as protecting critical habitats and ecosystem services, increasing fish abundance, conserving biodiversity, and supporting surrounding fisheries through spillover. However, less progress has been made in establishing protected areas in freshwater ecosystems, in part because freshwater systems face a number of unique challenges, such as upstream-downstream connectivity, temporal hydrological changes, and substantial human impacts. Despite these challenges, many freshwater protected areas are currently being established in the form of small, community-managed conservation zones. Can experiences from these two fields benefit one another? This session will bring together a diverse array of speakers to discuss challenges and successes in protected area establishment and management, and explore transferable lessons learned in marine systems that can improve the development of protected areas in freshwater systems.
12 EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON INLAND FISH AND AQUATIC ORGANISMS: LOOKING BACK AND MOVING FORWARD
  1. AbigailLynch, U.S. Geological Survey, National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center, ajlynch@usgs.gov
  2. CraigPaukert, U.S. Geological Survey, Missouri Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, paukertc@missouri.edu
Climate change will in a primary driver for inland aquatic systems and associated industries (e.g., aquaculture, commercial fishing). A key to the conservation, management, and sustainability of aquatic systems is understanding how climate change may affect them and their management. Our symposium will provide a broad overview of climate change effects on inland fish, including specific examples of the documented effects of climate change on aquatic biota and a review the challenges management agencies adapting to climate change. This session will compliment another session by Sauer, Frusher, Hobday, and Pecl that will focus on climate hotspots in marine systems. Therefore, our combined sessions will provide a broad view on the effects of climate change on both inland and marine systems.
13 HOW CAN NATURAL SCIENCE AND SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH BE INTEGRATED INTO SCIENCE ADVICE SO THAT IT IS USEFUL TO POLICY MAKERS AND THE BROADER SOCIETY?
  1. AlidaBundy, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, alida.bundy@dfo-mpo.gc.ca
  2. Mitsutaku MAKINO , Fisheries Research Agency, Japan, mmakino@affrc.go.jp
  3. AlanHaynie, NOAA/NMFS, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, alan.haynie@noaa.gov
  4. Jorn Schmidt, Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel, jschmidt@economics.uni-kiel.de
In recognition of the role of humans as both the main driver and the ultimate recipient of environmental change, and that it is necessary to engage humans, as individuals, communities and societies, to approaches that lead towards a sustainable future, several large scientific programs have formed sub groups focused on the human dimensions of fisheries and global change writ large. These large scientific programs, such as IMBER, ICES and PICES, have not traditionally included the social sciences, and arguably are still working out the optimal way to integrate natural and social science research into to their programs and into their science advice. Issues to be addressed include, but are not limited to how to acquire, mobilize and make available to marine managers, policy-makers, and other end-users of scientific information and knowledge contributing to secure transitions towards marine sustainability. The objective of this session is to explore these questions within and without large scientific programs and to pose the following questions: (i) What natural and social science evidence-based knowledge do marine policy makers and policy advisors want, consider, and need? (ii) What natural and social science evidence-based knowledge do marine dependent communities and stakeholder want, consider, and need? (iii) Are large scientific programs a good platform to stage this science and provide advice? (iv) What improvements, if any, would be recommended? (v) What is required to improve the marine science-policy-society interface?
15 ADVANCES IN ESTIMATING GLOBAL FISHERIES DISCARDS AND ADDRESSING BYCATCH OF MARINE MAMMALS, SEA TURTLES,AND SEABIRDS
  1. LeeBenaka, NOAA Fisheries, Lee.Benaka@noaa.gov
  2. MridulaSrinivasan, NOAA Fisheries, Mridula.Srinivasan@noaa.gov
  3. SteveKennelly, IC Independent Consulting, steve.kennelly@icic.net.au
This session will describe recent efforts to estimate global fisheries discards that are part of an overall project driven by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations to update its 2005 global fisheries discards estimate. Presenters will provide information about how discards are estimated and reported on parts of the world including the United States, Australia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. This session also will describe recent efforts to address bycatch of marine mammals, sea turtles, and seabirds through regulatory efforts and modified fishing gear. Overall, this session should be interested to fisheries professionals who would like to learn about how problematic discards are identified, assessed, and mitigated
16 OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES FOR MANAGEMENT OF SMALL-SCALE FISHERIES
  1. RenatoSilvano, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, renato.silvano@ufrgs.br
  2. Paul Simonin, Cornell University, U.S.A., pws44@cornell.edu
  3. Merrill Rudd, University of Washington, U.S.A., mbrudd@uw.edu
Small-scale fisheries are widespread and provide food (animal protein) and income to millions of people worldwide, especially in tropical developing countries. However, these fisheries are complex socio-ecological systems that are challenging to manage because of the variety of fishing gear used and fishing resources exploited lack of biological and socio-economic information, lack of institutional capacity, and poverty, among other factors. This challenge is exacerbated by the low political empowerment of many local fishing communities, which are often disregarded by central governments. Nevertheless, most of these fisheries are in ecosystems with high ecological importance, often with rich biodiversity providing important ecosystem services. Therefore, the neglect and management failure of small-scale fisheries will not only disrupt provision of food and income, affecting regional economies and food security, but may also negatively affect ecosystem functioning and biodiversity conservation. Despite these challenges, many small-scale fisheries show initiatives and characteristics that can help overcome management failures, such as common based or co-management arrangements, territorial rights or other rules devised by fishers and fishers’ local ecological knowledge. This session aims to drawn researchers from around the world to share ideas and discuss current opportunities and challenges regarding the management of small-scale fisheries (temperate, tropical, freshwater, and marine). The topics to be presented and discussed will include, but not be limited to: applications of fishers’ local ecological knowledge to improve management, empirical research to support management interventions (fishing restrictions, closed seasons or areas, fishing quotas), drivers of fishers’ behavior that can promote or undermine sustainability, ecological and socio-economic factors that could influence success of management measures, legal issues, outcomes and caveats of co-management systems, institutional issues of politics and governance. The length of presentations will be defined later, according to the total number of confirmed speakers and approved length of the session. Some time (from 20 to 30 minutes) will be provided at the end of the session for general discussion involving the speakers and the audience. The organizer should invite participant speakers to collaborate in a joint paper that show patterns and lessons that can be draw from all presentations, aimed to improve management of small-scale fisheries.
17 HYDROPOWER AND FISH: DISCUSSING IMPACTS GLOBALLY TO DEVELOP A SUSTANAIBLE FRAMEWORK
  1. Luiz GustavoM. da Silva, Federal University of São João del-Rei - UFSJ, luizsilva@ufsj.edu.br
  2. LeeBaumgartner, La Trobe University, L.Baumgartner@latrobe.edu.au
  3. Hans-PetterFjeldstad, SINTEF, Hans-Petter.Fjeldstad@sintef.no
Worldwide the development of hydropower facilities has caused several impacts on the fish fauna. There is renewed initiative to expand hydropower to increase low-carbon energy generation. Freshwater fish are the second most endangered vertebrate group after amphibians and species declines are not abating. The number of freshwater fish listed as vulnerable to extinction has increased and fishery yields have been significantly reduced in many rivers, such as the Lower Mekong and Parana River Basins. Therefore, not only from a biodiversity perspective this is an alarming scenario. Socially and economically such declines also have a significant effect, especially for developing nations which rely heavily on freshwater fish for their livelihood. Currently, hydropower is the largest source of renewable energy, contributing nearly 16% of the world’s total energy production in more than 160 countries. Regions like China, North America, OECD Europe and South America will continue to utilize large scale hydroelectricity generation, and considerable further development is expected in China, Brazil and many African countries. If such projected development is to be realized, it will be necessary to organize and prepare a framework to discuss strategies and plans to mitigate such impacts on freshwater fish and research can contribute significantly to advance in this topic. Accordingly, sharing knowledge and experiences among researches from different areas of the globe would be of paramount importance to facilitate the development of efficient strategies for the optimization of hydropower planning and the development of sustainable facilities. This session aims to promote such integration between researchers from developed and developing nations to discuss hydropower and fish issues, in pursuit of promoting qualified discussions to contribute to the development of such strategies. Certainly, these activities can contribute for the conservation of freshwater fish to enhance both biodiversity and fishery yields.
18 SCIENCE TO SUPPORT SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES IN CHANGING ECOSYSTEMS
  1. PatrickLynch, NOAA Fisheries, patrick.lynch@noaa.gov
  2. KirstenLarsen, NOAA Fisheries, kirsten.larsen@noaa.gov
  3. StephenBrown, NOAA Fisheries, stephen.k.brown@noaa.gov
Substantial progress has been made in recent decades toward achieving sustainable global fisheries. While many challenges remain, there are numerous instances where harvest rates no longer exceed levels associated with maximum sustainable yield, and where depleted stocks have been rebuilt to sustainable levels. These trends offer an optimistic view of the future of capture fisheries, which provide a necessary source of protein to the human population and represent a fundamental component of the global economy. However, the productivity of harvested species is inherently driven by the biotic and abiotic features of each species’ surrounding environment. Because many ecosystems are presently experiencing accelerated rates of change, long-term fishery sustainability will only be achieved if the scientific advice provided to fisheries managers is relatively robust or responsive to ecosystem shifts and variability. A responsive management system facilitates the optimization of total yield, where robust management measures are buffered against changes in productivity, thereby maintaining consistent harvest rates, albeit at levels that may be below those associated with maximum sustainable yield. In most cases, the scientific process typically used to develop recommended harvest rates (i.e., stock assessments) is not directly calibrated by ecosystem variables, nor is it routine to evaluate the long-term robustness of management measures to environmental variability and change. Thus, a challenge facing fisheries science is the consideration of ecosystem dynamics to develop harvest rates that are either fine-tuned to reflect changes in productivity or are sufficiently buffered to ensure consistent fishing effort. This session will focus on the concept of achieving long-term fisheries sustainability in the face of variable and changing ecosystems.
19 ANTI-AGING MATERIALS FROM MARINE PLANTS AND THEIR MOLECULAR MECHANISMN
  1. Jae SueChoi, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Pukyong National University, choijs@pknu.ac.kr
There has been a growing interest in health promoting role of certain foods above their nutritional value. Thus, research efforts to identify functional and bioactive components from many natural sources including plants, animals, microorganisms, and marine organisms have been intensified. The marine environment, which contains a vast array of organisms comprising a half of the global biodiversity, is evolved as an exceptional reservoir of bioactive components, many of which exhibit unique structural/chemical features that are not found in terrestrial plants. Despite the possibility of being a great source of diverse bioactive substances, marine source is still one of the most underutilized biological resources. However, intensive efforts have been made to isolate and identify many compounds with promising potential health benefits from this promising resource. Among marine organisms, many marine algae are consumed as popular sea vegetables in many Asian countries including Korea, China, and Japan due to their rich contents of minerals, vitamins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, polysaccharides, and low content of lipids. Beside food value, current researches have revealed many potential therapeutic and health benefits of red, brown and green algae including anticancer, anti-obesity, antidiabetic, antihypertensive, anti-hyperlipidemic, antioxidant, anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, antiestrogenic, thyroid stimulating, neuroprotective, antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial and tissue healing properties. Recently, their value as a source of bioactive compounds has grown rapidly, and therefore, extensive investigation leads to isolation of many bioactive compounds such as sulphated polysaccharides, phlorotannins, carotenoids, minerals, peptides, diterpenes, and sulfolipids, with diverse biological activities.
20 EAFTA2016 INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON THE RECENT RESEARCH TREND OF ASIAN SEAFOOD TECHNOLOGY
  1. Kunihiko Konno , Hokkaido University, Japan , konno@fish.hokudai.ac.jp
  2. Sang Moo Kim, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Korea , smkim@gwnu.ac.kr
  3. Don Hyun Ahn, Pukyong National University, Korea, dhahn@pknu.ac.kr
We Asian countries commonly have traditional seafood consuming culture with a slight different background. Because of their important role as nutrients intake, enormous knowledge on marine resources has been accumulated. These are fundamental and practical ones. In addition to these, recent world-wide trend in Fisheries Science is sustainable and eco-friendly utilization of marine resources. It is essential to understand characteristic properties of compounds in marine resources such as proteins, lipids, sugars, and unique low molecular-weight compounds. Full utilization of marine resources after the harvest requires studies on how to keep the quality of marine resources and how to control their properties during its processing. Moreover, safety of seafood is indispensable research field for its full utilization. Recent another trend is on finding health-benefit compounds in marine resources for human being. Considering the situations, it seems very important to understand, recognize, and discuss on the utilization of marine resources in Asian countries. Our goal is to construct solid network among scientists in these countries and propose a new concept on the marine resource utilization.
21 AQUACULTURE IN THE FUTURE AND BEYOND
  1. Jinhwan Lee , NFRDI, Korea, jinhwanlee@korea.kr
It is surely beyond doubt that aquaculture industry, with its average annual growth rate of 3.2 percent from 1961 to 2009, has seen a rapid growth compared to other industries. Aquaculture has better satisfied the increasing demand of modern fish markets than traditional fisheries. A recent FAO report indicates that about 50% of aquatic products for human consumption comes from aquaculture while the rest from catch-based fisheries. In response to steadily rising demand for aquatic food worldwide, aquaculture industry should be further boosted and developed for sustainable supply of aquatic food. Aquaculture, however, is vulnerable to diseases and adverse impacts of environmental changes. In addition, there has been emerging concerns over several problems aquaculture has brought about: environmental pollution, eutrophication, extravagant fishmeal consumption, and ecosystem disturbance by the escape of cultured animals into natural seawater. Damages to ecosystem integrity have been caused mostly by inappropriate aquaculture operations. All these factors have long been bottlenecks to the growth of aquaculture. Scientists have put significant efforts into preparing solutions to these problems, highlighting the aquaculture with a balanced ecosystem. Our research activities should be able to bear fruitful outcomes for sustainable aquaculture. Some of the research outcomes can be useful only to specific areas, but in a comprehensive perspective, every research outcome we produce will significantly contribute to the overall growth of aquaculture industry. We believe that aquaculture scientists across the globe have always joined forces to address common challenges we have faced, demonstrating a vibrant spirit of collaboration. In that sense, the World Fisheries Congress has been a perfect platform to discuss major issues in aquaculture and to present selected research projects under the participation of renowned experts across the world. Major topics for the Congress 2016 will include an ecofriendly and energy-efficient aquaculture system, artificial fish feed improvement, and a cutting edge technology for sustainable inland and inshore aquaculture. The outcomes of discussions during the Congress will provide blueprints for global research topics for aquaculture in the future and beyond.
22 ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT
  1. DanielCorrie, Australian Fishereis Management Authority , daniel.corrie@afma.gov.au
  2. DonBromhead, Australian Fishereis Management Authority , don.bromhead@afma.gov.au
  3. VikiObrien, Australian Fishereis Management Authority , viki.obrien@afma.gov.au
The Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA) aims to minimise the impact of Commonwealth managed fisheries on all aspects of the marine environment. In recent years, there has been a shift of focus from direct management of target species to considering the impacts of fishing on the broader ecosystem. In this session we will talk about the framework AFMA has developed to assess, mitigate and monitor the impact of Commonwealth managed fisheries on the marine environment. We will talk about the history and recent developments in the area of Ecological Risk Assessments (ERA). We will also describe AFMA’s Ecological Risk Management (ERM) framework and talk about the importance of having appropriate quality management systems in place. Each presentation will include practical examples of how the risk assessment and risk management framework has been implemented in Australia, and how the framework might be applied to international fisheries
24 CHINA AQUACULTURE: FOOD SUPPLY, RESOURCES CONSERVATION, AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
  1. Qingyin Wang, Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Qingdao, China; qywang@public.qd.sd.cn
  2. Zhongjie Li, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China; zhongjie@ihb.ac.cn
  3. Shouqi Xie, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China; sqxie@ihb.ac.cn
  4. Yushun Chen, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China; yushunchen@ihb.ac.cn
Aquaculture will be the main source of world aquatic food in the future. China contributes more than 60 percent of the world aquaculture output. However, the history and current development of China aquaculture may not be fully understood by the world, and sometimes even with misunderstanding. Here we organize renowned China aquaculture related expert representatives from different research areas to present (1) an overall history and current status of China aquaculture; (2) aquaculture modes and feed use; (3) eco-aquaculture and healthy aquaculture; (4) natural resources conservation; (5) environmental protection, and (6) new technologies and applications. An open discussion will be provided for extensive communications between Chinese aquaculture scientists and scientists from the rest of the world. Experience and challenges of China aquaculture will be shared and discussed in the session.
25 AREA-CAPABILITY APPROACH FOR COASTAL COMMUNITY AND FISHERIES DEVELOPMENTS
  1. Dr. Satoshi ISHIKAWA, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Japan, oounagi@chikyu.ac.jp
  2. Dr. Ricardo BABARAN, University of Philippines, Visayas, Philippines, rpbabaran@yahoo.com
  3. Dr. Methee KAEWNERN, Faculty of Fisheries Science, Kasetsart University, Thailand, ffismtk@ku.ac.th
Area-Capability was proposed as a new concept to evaluate good practices in which utilization and conservation of natural resources being in well balanced. This session will provide a forum for discussion how the Area-Capability concept can be applied into sustainable fisheries development in coastal area. Fishing gears and operations, stock status and varieties of targets, human resource development and educations, social capitals and market linkages are expected to have big impact on area-capability of fishers’ villages. The session will discuss and exchange experiences and ideas how integrate these multiple information towards sustainable development of fisheries community based on the good balance between ecosystem health and capability enhancement in coastal areas. 1. Varieties and important roles of coastal fisheries for rural developments As coastal ecosystems holding high biodiversity, coastal fishery has various targets species and gears. Then, the coastal fishery usually provides various importance for rural communities, e.g., food supply, Job opportunity, cultural events etc. This theme session entertain talks and posters on varieties of coastal fisheries activities and multiple-importance for rural developments based on detail information. 2. Community based fisheries activities for sustainable coastal development Community based fisheries can improve both fisheries resource managements and human resource developments in coastal communities, and provide alternative utilization of fisheries resources, e.g., in tourism and education. This theme session will concentrate on evaluation of the key issues for community activities in coastal society, in order to share the experiences of good practices. 3. Area-Capability enhancement through fisheries developments For rural development, increasing local resources in kinds and volumes, increasing local communities which utilize the local resources should be treated as targets, but at the same time, users should take care of the local resources for sustainable utilization in Area-capability concept. This theme session concentrate on evaluation of applicability of Area-capability approach for fisheries development based on case studies of community based activities in the world.
26 THIRD PARTY CERTIFICATION FOR WILD CAPTURE FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE
  1. Lynda Bellchambers, Department of Fisheries Western Australia, Lynda.Bellchambers@fish.wa.gov.au, +61 8 92030175
  2. Dan Gaughan, Department of Fisheries Western Australia, daniel.gaughan@fish.wa.gov.au
While many fisheries around the world are being fished and managed sustainably the increased profile of stock sustainability and the potential impacts of fishing practices on the environment has led to an increased awareness of environmental issues by the general public and conservation groups. Growing awareness of sustainable fishing practices has led to an increase in consumer demand for sustainably-sourced seafood products. Third party certification and ecolabels are one mechanism for addressing increasing public concerns regarding the sustainability of fish stocks and fishing practices. They are also an increasing component of the marketing strategies of the international seafood industry with a number of large international retailers incorporating ecolabels into their seafood sustainability policies. However, the rapid increase in seafood certification programs in the last ten years is not solely due to market mechanisms but a complex combination of social, economic, political and environmental drivers that vary from fishery to fishery. This whole day symposium aims to bring together a range of stakeholders involved in third party certification programs (i.e. certification bodies, third party assessment bodies, fisheries managers and scientists, industry and the conservation sector) to discuss the challenges and benefits of third party certification and issues that present challenges to the future credibility and accessibility of third party certification programs. Suggested subthemes are; • The benefits and challenges of third party certification – different perspectives (industry, managers, assessors and certification bodies); • Impacts of third party certification – case studies from certified fisheries (economic, social, political and environmental outcomes); • Does third party certification have a role in promoting biodiversity/conservation or is it just about sustainable fisheries?; • Finding the balance – increasing accessibility while maintaining rigours standards
27 INTEGRATED OCEAN MANAGEMENT
  1. Prof. Bronwyn Gillanders School of Biological Sciences University of Adelaide, Bronwyn.gillanders@adelaide.edu.au
Marine ecosystems are becoming increasingly crowded with a growing demand by multiple users for space and resources. Integrated ocean management is a logical and necessary step in progressing our understanding of the cumulative impacts of multiple activities, avoiding unintended consequences of sector-specific management and dealing with competing/conflicting interests among stakeholders. Integrated ocean management is the coordinated management of diverse activities with consideration of ecological, economic, social and institutional (i.e. governance) objectives to sustainably develop our coasts and oceans. This session seeks input from around the world to discuss how best to coordinate management of diverse activities with consideration of ecological, economic, social and institutional objectives to sustainably develop our coasts and oceans. Particular themes may include the governance, legislative and policy frameworks; stakeholder, multiple use objectives; integration and cumulative impacts
28 ADVANCEMENTS IN STOCK ASSESSMENT AND THE PROVISION OF MANAGEMENT ADVICE (PART 1)
  1. Richard D. Methot, richard.methot@noaa.gov
  2. Mark Maunder, mmaunder@iattc.org
The 2012 World Conference of Stock Assessment Methods initiated a widespread effort to communicate and advance the field of fishery stock assessments. Advances continue to be made at a rapid pace in methods to analyze fishery catch, abundance and biological data to provide scientific advice for fishery management. These advances seek to deal with integrating all the information available, with data-limited situations, with conflicts among data sources in data-rich situations, and with the inclusion of data made available by new technologies and ecosystem investigations. They extend abilities to address complex processes across space and time, while still extracting major signals in the underlying system being studied. They directly address methods to track long-term drift in a system’s underlying dynamics due to climate, ecosystem and habitat changes without relying on direct information on the causal factors. They expand the scope of the factors modeled so that causal mechanisms such as predator-prey relationships become part of the modeled system. As model complexity increases, so does the challenge of ecosystem monitoring and dealing properly with the uncertainty associated with the large number of structural factors that need calibration. Effective models also need to address methods to distill complex information into informative advice for fishery managers and the stakeholders while taking uncertainty into consideration. We see development of methods ranging from the use of a diversity of operating models in management strategy evaluations to the development of decision support systems based on ensembles of models.
29 AN HONEST APPRAISAL OF STOCK ASSESSMENT, REFERENCE POINTS, HARVEST CONTROL RULES AND MANAGEMENT STRATEGY EVALUATION (PART 2)
  1. Richard D. Methot, richard.methot@noaa.gov
  2. Mark Maunder, mmaunder@iattc.org
As fisheries management around the world moves towards adoption of more formal rules for fisheries management (e.g. harvest control rules based on reference points), more accurate and precise stock assessments become all the more important. Unfortunately however, stock assessments are generally imprecise because of the limited information of the data typically available, and their accuracy is strongly dependent on simplifying assumptions. This situation is not likely to improve appreciably in the near future. It is not unusual for estimates of management quantities to double or halve based on alternative assumptions. As a consequence, management strategy evaluation (MSE) has become popular, but it is often restricted to application under simple stock assessment approaches or empirical indicators. In addition, MSE is often conditioned on traditional stock assessments, which are used to develop states of nature consistent with the data available for assessments. In many cases there has been no demonstration that MSE performs any better than traditional stock assessment in the provision of management advice. As a consequence, the reference points and harvest control rules that are generally applied come into question. Improved estimates of uncertainty and methods to account for such uncertainty in management advice are needed. Linked to this there is a need to resolve the frequent mismatch between the management advice that stock assessment scientist can and do provide and the management advice that is desired by stakeholders. We propose a session at the 7th World Fisheries congress that addresses the resolution of this mismatch. We envision presentations that assimilate a broad spectrum of information rather than specific information. These include opinion pieces from researchers with considerable experience. The goal of the session would be to provide guidance on what approach should be taken in providing management advice and where we should be heading for the future. The session would be linked with another larger session that focusses on more specific methodology or applications. The session will cover half a day with 5 presentations of 30 minutes (25 + 5 for questions) and a 30 minute panel discussion. The panel will involve the 5 speakers (see below). Written discussion questions will be solicited from the audience in advance and the chair will choose which questions will be asked. Mark Maunder will chair the session and panel discussion.
30 FISHERIES AND FISH BIOLOGY
  1. BoluwajiSolarin, c/o Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research, Victoria Island, Lagos, Nigeria., bolusolarin@yahoo.com
The fisheries industry deals with fisheries resources, aquatic animal groups for human use while fish biology is a study on the structure and function of fish and their relationship with ecosystems. Since self-renewability is the main trait of fisheries resources, environmental and ecological factors that have an impact on this trait and the fisheries industry should be researched. In addition, it is very important to find countermeasures for sustainable fisheries resource use and sustainable ecosystems. To this end, during the fisheries industry and fish biology session, several topics will be dealt with as follows
31 STANDARD METHODS FOR SAMPLING FRESHWATER FISHES: OPPORTUNITIES FOR GLOBAL COLLABORATION
  1. Ian J. Winfield, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Lancaster, UK, ijw@ceh.ac.uk
  2. Scott A. Bonar, USGS, University of Arizona, USA, sbonar@ag.arizona.edu
The ability to compare data over time and throughout areas, via standard sampling, standard indices and standard comparison methods, has revolutionized many areas of inland fisheries science, such as baseline knowledge of fish populations and ecology, conservation and management of inland fish and fisheries education. Conversely, the inability to compare data at large scales and over time has resulted in difficulty in fisheries planning, monitoring trends and having enough samples to make useful conclusions. Because of the improved benefits to fisheries biologists, the scale at which standardization has occurred is steadily increasing. Historically, standardization only occurred at country, state, province or local levels. However, now continent wide standards for fish sampling have been developed (e.g. North America: American Fisheries Society; Europe: European Committee for Standardization), and are being increasingly adopted. The ability to compare freshwater fish data collected in different regions of the world would provide great benefits to fisheries managers. The goal of this symposium is to investigate opportunities to move forward in the standardization of freshwater fish sampling methods to improve collaboration and communication among scientists and managers in different countries. Specific objectives of this session will be to: (1) provide to participants short overviews of standard freshwater fish sampling methods used around the world; (2) present examples of how such programs are currently being used, and (3) convene a facilitated discussion among participants to solicit ideas how standard sampling programs in North American and Europe can better work with inland fish programs in Asia, Africa, South America and Australasia.
33 NEW TECHNOLOGIES IN FISHERIES SURVEYS
  1. Junghwa Choi , National Fisheries Research & Development Institute, Gijang-gun Busan, Korea, choi2291@korea.kr
  2. Kyonghoon Lee, Chonnam National University, Chonnam Yoesu, Korea, ricky1106@naver.com
For an estimation of various fish species in a specific sea area, multiple direct survey methods are utilized. Trawl surveys, ichthyoplankton surveys, hydro-acoustic surveys and sighting surveys are widely used today. These methods have difficulties in dealing with equipment problems, interpretation of survey results and error types stemming from patchy distribution of marine organisms. So, new resources survey methods to tackle challenges mentioned above will be discussed in this chapter.
34 EARLY LIFE HISTORY AND RECRUITMENT DYNAMICS
  1. HeeyongKim , National Fisheries Research & Development Institute, Gijang-gun Busan, Korea, heeyongkim@korea.kr
  2. JeonghoPark, East Sea Fisheries Research Institute, National Fisheries Research & Development Institute, Gangneung, Gangwon-Do, Korea, marinebio@korea.kr
Since early life history researches provide information concerning fish species, spawning period and spawning grounds as well as the variation of distribution density, many researches on this issue are underway across the world. Not only has the size of a brood stock, but also its early life history before it joins a population had an impact on the quantitative fluctuation of the fish population. In this vein, understanding the relationship between the early life history and the recruitment mechanism of fisheries resources is necessary for efficient use and management of fisheries resources. In this chapter, the mechanisms that determine the abundance of fisheries resources as well as the relationship between early life history of animals and their recruitment mechanism will be under discussion.
35 STOCK ASSESSMENT METHODS: CURRENT STATUS AND RECENT INNOVATIONS
  1. JaebongLee, National Fisheries Research & Development Institute, Gijang-gun Busan, Korea, leejb@korea.kr
  2. JunghwaChoi, National Fisheries Research & Development Institute, Gijang-gun Busan, Korea, choi2291@korea.kr
Traditional fisheries resource evaluations have focused on target species at the population level. However, understanding not only the surrounding ecosystem environment of fisheries resources but also related mechanisms with other organisms is a prerequisite for a fisheries resource evaluation. Against this backdrop, evaluation methods including the current status of resource evaluation, challenges and mechanisms concerning the whole future ecosystem will be discussed with this topic.
36 MARINE RANCHING STATUS AND EFFECTIVENESS: IS IT POSSIBLE TO ENHANCE FISHERIES RESOURCES THROUGH MARINE RANCHING PROJECTS?
  1. Chang-gil Kim, cg0925@fira.or.kr (Korea Fisheries Resources Agency)
  2. Jin-wook Hwang, jwh@fira.or.kr (Korea Fisheries Resources Agency)
Many countries have developed various types of marine ranching applications to enhance their fisheries resources. One method is the development of artificial reefs to enhance the reproduction and survival of resources from spawning to juvenile and adult fish by improving the current food web. Another approach is the release of hatchery-reared seedlings of the resident stocks. The integration of these two methods is now chiefly utilized in marine ranching. However, because the fisheries environment varies according to countries, different technologies may be required for success in marine ranching. To attain the objectives of marine ranching projects, a number of questions must still be addressed. Will artificial reefs used in marine ranching contribute to the restoration of degraded natural habitats and fisheries? Will fish stock increase after the placement of artificial reefs in marine ranching areas? Will the hatchery-reared seedlings released in marine ranching areas contribute to the enhancement of fisheries resources? This session aims to introduce and review the marine ranching technologies currently being developed in various countries
37 SEAWEED BED DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT
  1. Hak-jin Hwang, hhj444@fira.or.kr (Korea Fisheries Resources Agency)
  2. Jong-sheek Kim, philllip@fira.or.kr (Korea Fisheries Resources Agency)
Seaweed beds provide habitat for many marine organisms and serve as spawning, breeding, and feeding grounds. Seaweeds on rocky bottoms are an important source of drifting plants that serve as feeding grounds and refuges for coastal marine life. However, recently seaweeds are disappearing due to diverse causes. To cope with these losses, many countries are promoting seaweed bed creation projects to restore seaweeds in areas that have become barren or to maintain and enlarge existing seaweed beds. However, many difficulties have been encountered in seaweed bed projects and several important questions must still be addressed. Will the transplanted seaweeds reproduce and produce a new generation? The seaweeds transplanted in barren areas grow till the adult stage, but they then disappear without reproducing. Thus, repeated transplantation of seaweed must be conducted at regular intervals. Are the methods to protect the seaweed bed from herbivores, such as the sea urchin, adequately developed? How do we assess the impact of climate change on the habitat of seaweed species when planning new seaweed bed creation projects? This session aims to introduce and review seaweed bed technologies currently being developed in various countries
38 RESEARCH AND MANAGEMENT FOR MARINE BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES
  1. Byoung-Seol Koh, Korea Marine Environment Management Corporation; bskoh@koem.or.kr
  2. Jung-ho Nam, Korea Maritime Institute; jhnam@kmi.re.kr
The purpose of this session is to discuss on research methods on biodiversity conservation and sustainable ecosystem services for the marine ecosystem affected by coastal development and pollution. Information sharing on the various research outcomes in the field of marine biodiversity will be the key agenda which will also link with introduction of national policy on sustainable use of marine and fisheries resources. Marine Protected Areas designated for protecting endangered species and habitats which are identified through marine ecosystem survey and integrated management of invasive or harmful species are main topics in this session. Furthermore, the concept of marine ecosystem services should be discussed to evaluate the value of the marine ecosystem.
39 Aquatic metagenomic profiling: planktonic and microbial assemblages and their functions on environment and aquaculture
  1. Shugo Watabe, Kitasato University School of Marine Biosciences, Kanagawa, Japan., swatabe@kitasato-u.ac.jp
  2. Katsuhiko Mineta, Computational Bioscience Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, katsuhiko.mineta@kaust.edu.sa
Metagenomics has become an important research tool that elucidates in-depth taxonomic profiles and functions of planktonic, microbial as well as viral communities without the need of prior cultivation in the laboratory. It also identifies ecological role of the toxic picoplankton, its metabolism and evolutionary history. Thus, metagenomics has made unprecedented contribution to the field of microbial ecology by highlighting various ecological and environmental issues, and recently focusing on biogeochemical cycles. As sequencing cost continues to decrease, it has found its way to routine investigations including water monitoring, providing comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem and function of microbes within the environment. In this session, we aim to discuss insights into the evolution, function, diversity and various aspects of marine as well as freshwater planktonic and microbial communities related to environmental variables. Furthermore, the application of metagenomics in identifying useful biomolecules and its potential use in agro-industrial discipline should be discussed.